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Mahindra Scorpio Facelift Review & Test Drive

OVERVIEW ;

In 1998 Tata launched India’s 1st Indigenous SUV the Tata Safari. Mahindra was not a brand to settle and for a viewing seat. So in 2002 Mahindra launched the 2nd indigenous SUV in India called the Scorpio. This car was more focussed on style than hardcore SUV capabilities. Mahindra Scorpio has developed a great fan following.It is a lot more efficient now and the price remains the same too. With a lot of improvements the Scorpio is almost a new vehicle. Let us check what all is new in the Mahindra Scorpio. Check Ex Showroom Price of Scorpio

EXTERIORS AND STYLE ;

M&M has retained the body of the old car, though most of the panels, except for the roof and doors, are new. The overall proportions are still lopsided, thanks to the excessive height and narrow width of the body (which has an effect on the driving dynamics) and it’s easily recognisable as a Scorpio.It’s the nose that is truly all new and gives the Scorpio a fresh face. The big fan-shaped grille has been replaced with a slimmer but wider design with distinctive looking ‘dagger-shaped’ chrome strips. The headlamp cluster is also superbly designed, with a neat LED strip sitting above the projector lamps. We also loved the way the smart-looking skid plate has been integrated into the tough-looking bumpers. The bonnet scoop adds a sporty touch, apart from feeding cool air directly to the air-to-air intercooler. Apply car loan for Scorpio at Carzprice

From the side, the carryover doors and windows make the changes less obvious and the old-fashioned rain channels betray the Scorpio’s vintage.There’s new plastic cladding and a cheesy looking faux vent behind the wheel arch, which don’t really work, but the larger 17-inch wheels do improve the Scorpio’s stance.The plastic cladding on the tailgate with an inset chrome garnish for the number plate do a good job of making the upright Scorpio look less slab-sided from the rear. The tail-lights with their LEDs and clear glass are another design highlight.

Given the limitations the designers had, it’s fair to say they’ve done a pretty good job. The new Scorpio looks far more sophisticated than before, though we are not sure how well this would go down with traditional Scorpio owners. The big changes though are below the body and centre on the all-new ladder or body-on-frame chassis that will underpin future Mahindras. The new chassis is far stiffer and stronger than before, and is designed to meet future crash regulations. The limitations of the body didn’t allow the wheelbase to be altered, though the new chassis can be stretched and widened to suit the dimensions of future models.

INTERIORS AND SPACE ;

Step inside the Scorpio facelift and there is hardly anything that an individual can relate with the previous model. The cabin seems to be extremely advanced and up-market, with an array of never-seen-before sophisticated and contemporary features. To begin with, the SUV has an all-new dual tone black and beige dashboard with new blue-grey interior scheme. The conventional and old-fashioned faux-wooden finish for AC vents and centre console have gone for a toss in favour of new chrome finished A/C vents and premium looking centre console and needless to say, both these upgrades lift the overall ambiance of the cabin tremendously. The new centre console displays all vital informations’ related to gear position, trip distance, fuel and temperature. There is a new steering wheel with audio controls and cruise control mounted on it which is being sourced directly from the elder sibling XUV 500. Vouching for decent comfort and convenience inside the cabin, viola! Mahindra Scorpio comes loaded with an array of such dynamic features which rejuvenates an individual inside out. Some of the prominent ones present in the SUV are Fully automatic temperature control (FATC), Height adjustable driver’s seat, Front centre arm rest, 12V accessory sockets for front and middle rows, Smart rain and light sensors and Reverse parking sensors. By no means, Mahindra intends to hurt the sentiments of music and technology lovers as it has incorporated a new Hi-Tech 6-inch touch screen infotainment system with inbuilt GPS

Navigation/Bluetooth/CD/DVD/USB/Aux in the top-end variant S10. However, the mid-level variants like S6, S6+ and S8 haven’t been left out as they consist of a 2 Din Audio System with CD/USB/AUX with speakers and tweeters as standard features. On the contrary, the entry-level variant S2 seems to be quite lacklustre and impotent as it barely boasts anything in terms of comfort and convenience stuff.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE ;

The new Scorpio is powered by either one of two engines, a 2523cc four-pot that makes 75bhp and 200Nm or a 2179cc common-rail diesel with 120bhp and 280Nm. The S10 you see on these pages is powered by the latter and remains old-school in providing drive primarily to the rear wheels, with the fronts getting power as well in the 4WD version. It is a tractable engine, and combined with the slick-shifting gearbox, one can keep a good pace going. It is rated at 15.4kmpl, which is strangely more than the XUV’s. However, it exceeds the Safari Storme’s ARAI figure but lags behind the Duster/Terrano twins by a significant amount. The Scorpio’s engine has a little turbo lag, but things are moving nicely along by the time 1800rpm comes around, and it will rev happily to its redline beyond 4000rpm but there’s no real gain beyond 3000rpm. Keep the revs between 2000 and 3000 rpm, and the Scorpio moves along at a surprising pace. There is no automatic or petrol option available at this point in time. The turning radius of the 2WD model has been reduced to 5.4m but the 4WD remains the same as before at 5.7

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

Another huge change on the new Mahindra Scorpio is the chassis. It still is a body-on-ladder frame SUV but the ladder frame has been completely revised for the new model. The frame is lighter and doubly stiff as compared to the older Scorpio. The wheelbase has been kept the same but the tracks – front and rear – are wider in order to reduce the turning circle as well as improve stability. What’s more, the suspension geometry has been altered, there are new more effective dampers and there’s even an anti-roll bar now at the rear. And of course the new Scorpio now runs 17 inch wheels instead of 16 inchers.On the road, the new Scorpio feels better tied down now. There’s still some side to side movement and the ride quality over broken roads is still jiggly, but it isn’t uncomfortable. The ride is also quieter and the increase in travel along with bigger wheels makes the new Mahindra Scorpio almost invincible over pot holes, no matter how huge. As for ease of driving, the shorter turning circle makes it easier to manoeuvre; the visibility is still great upfront and from the sides and via the large ORVMs; and with reverse parking sensors (in this the S10 trim), parking is a non-issue too.

One of the big issues with the older Scorpio was its unrefined dynamics. Even though various improvements were made over its near decade and a half long lifespan, the handling and braking of the Scorpio was never really secure. Now with the new chassis, new track lengths and significant suspension changes, the new Mahindra Scorpio feels a lot more planted. It’s still not a handling or braking benchmark, but you can finally push it hard without a prayer. The steering response is acceptable and even though the Scorpio still rolls and dives, the movements aren’t alarmingly high. The brake feel has improved and the new Scorpio displays less tendency now to swing about under hard braking.

SAFETY FEATURES ;

The outgoing Scorpio did feature a longlist of comfort features such as rain sensingwipers, auto lights, tyre pressure monitor,parking sensor, start-stop technology andmore. The new Scorpio carries forwardthese features as well. Safety features likedual-airbags and ABS will continue tobe offered, a new Panic Brake Indicationhas also been included. All the additionsand modifications will add to the pricebut we still think Mahindra will price itcompetitively. The number of variants hasincreased too, allowing buyers to choosethe model that suits them best.

CONCLUSSION ;

The Mahindra Scorpio facelift like we said will be launching towards the end of the year 2017 and most probably towards the festive season. The SUV will be getting mild updates to its exterior as well as interior while there won’t be any changes made under the hood. There is a slight possibility of Mahindra introducing a petrol variant alongside the diesel version while it will surely get a new 6-speed automatic transmission as well.

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